What You Need to Know About Sabbatical Leave

September 6, 20211:09 pm754 views
What You Need to Know About Sabbatical Leave
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Depending on their employment status, employees are entitled to some different types of leave, such as sick leave, parental leave, and even vacation leave. Beside these widely-known leaves, have you heard about the less-popular sabbatical leave? 

Sabbatical leave is a period of time when an employee does not go to work but is still employed. Employees who want to pursue personal interests such as education, traveling, writing, and volunteering activities typically take this type of leave. It is one of the extra perks an organization can offer to employees who have worked for them for a specific amount of time. Here is what you need to know about sabbatical leave.

Understanding Sabbatical Leave

Sabbatical leave was originally granted to professors and university educators where they can take a semester or two off to enhance their studies, teach at a foreign institution, do independent research, or write. Nowadays, an increasing number of organizations are providing sabbatical leave to their employees so they can take a long break from work. This can be paid or unpaid, as this is generally just a long period of absence.

Although there is no law requiring companies to provide this perk, it is one of the strategies to attract and retain top talents. This leave is provided to employees when they have served for a specific number of years, generally more than five. Adobe, for example, gives four weeks of sabbatical to employees who have worked for the company for at least five years. Meanwhile, those who have worked for at least ten years get to earn five weeks of sabbatical leave. 

Here are several benefits of sabbatical leave for both employees and the company.

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For the Employees

As much as employees love their job, they will also love any kind of leave, especially when it is long enough while not risking their job. Despite taking a long break during sabbatical leave, employees will come back with a refreshed mind and thus help the company develop new ideas and innovations. Employees who took a sabbatical had lower stress levels when they returned to work, a study suggested. 

The extended break has also contributed to an increase in psychological resources and improved general well-being among employees. Self-satisfaction is essential for professional success, and a sabbatical can help employees achieve it. This is because they divert their emphasis to personal objectives and growth when there is no work around.

For the Company

Work can get really stressful at times and even lead to burnout, which is why employees deserve to take short leaves in a year. Organizations may demonstrate their willingness to care for employees’ wellbeing and personal growth by implementing a sabbatical leave policy, which is likely to attract top talent and boost corporate image. Compared to employees quitting their jobs all at once due to burnout, sabbatical leave can be a preferable alternative since it reduces the expense of hiring and training new employees. When a manager or supervisor is on sabbatical, the employee who covers for them will develop essential experience and abilities.  

Benefits are received by both employees and businesses who adopt sabbatical leave policy. Having understood the benefits of a sabbatical leave, you need to take extra measures into implementing one. Some companies may not be able to implement this policy due to the consistently high demand of work. Therefore, such an organization needs to carefully examine its viability so the business operation will not be harmed. There are also companies who have an option for this leave, but unpaid. In such a case, it is best for employees to first check into the availability of this policy to the HR department so they know what they’re entitled to.

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