Tips for HR to Manage Millennials

December 30, 20169:57 am
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Millennial generation as we commonly refer, is for those born between 1980s and the 1990s. Now these generations in the age groups of 30s and late 20s, are almost ready to join the workforce or have already embarked into the work life with some significant years of experience.

A Pew Research conducted in 2015 found that one third American workers are millennials. While in Singapore, millennials make up for 22 percent of resident population, which makes them the largest market with great employment potential.

Dominating major numbers in the talent pools, the future of business world is in the hands of millennials or the Gen Z for years to come. Known for their engagement with digital technology, it is crucial for HR leaders to deploy strategies on how to attract and draw top millennial talents to your company.

Compared to Baby Boomers and Gen X, millennials have distinct characteristics and workstyle that require particular attention from HR strategists. Millennials are exposed to more racial and ethnic diversity, which makes them better at working in a team across geographies rather than individually.

Seeking for new challenges and flexibility at work, they tend to avoid tedious work pace that obliges them to deal with monotonous paperwork. To prepare for the big wave of upcoming millennials entering your business, this piece will provide you with sound insights on how to manage the next-generation of talented leaders.

See: How different are Work-Life Demands of Millennials in Singapore from their Global Counterparts?

Leadership and guidance

Millennials are inspired by people they can relate with. In order to gain their trust and respect, HR managers should provide leadership and guidance. As future successors of the business, millennials own great potentials to develop. Perhaps a newbie to the world of work today, but they are keen on learning fast from their higher-ups, so you need to invest a lot of time to train, mentor and assist them in getting their jobs done.

While millennials are known for being active job hoppers in search for better pay and seeking purpose in their jobs, HR managers should be able to socialise company’s values and ask for their commitment towards achieving the organisation vision.

Teamwork and networking

Millennials are used to working with diverse co-workers, they can work best in a team and are good at networking. They firmly believe that ‘two is better than one’, which means more can be accomplished by working in groups, rather than alone. Possessed with capabilities to create wide networks, you can take advantage of this generation’s ideas to reach out to global audiences.  

Digital savvy and multitasking

Born in an era where information can be accessed in matter of seconds, millennials are highly-engaged with technology and they are digital savvy. Compared to other generations, their level of technology-literacy is more than you could possibly imagine. Businesses can harness their talent potential to improve efficiencies in workings and generate positive outcomes.

Answering phone calls when penning down emails is no big deal for millennials. They are sharp, and good at multitasking. They can perform several jobs simultaneously with unilateral focus, which is a great benefit for company’s productivity.

Fun at work

For most millennials, work has to be fun, because boring is bad. They want to have fun at work without neglecting their responsibilities.

To create a happy and enjoyable atmosphere at work, HR managers should create recreation rooms where millennials can relax between tight schedules, modern cafeteria where workforce across departments can meet and gather, or hold community events for employees to develop interpersonal relationship with their co-workers.

HRs should also take active interest in encouraging healthy life-work balance by investing into construction of mini sport centres or yoga rooms.

Read also: Millennials in Indonesia are Keen on Working for Start-Ups